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Archive for Pennie Opal Plant

WE ARE ALL RELATED: Working together to fight fossil fuels

Pennie Opal Plant, LUSH Blog, May 2016
Author Pennie Opal Plant -Yaqui, Mexican, English, Choctaw, Cherokee and European leader and Ponca elder and tribal councilwoman, Casey Camp Horinek

Author Pennie Opal Plant is of Yaqui, Mexican, English, Choctaw, Cherokee and European ancestry. She’s been an activist for over 30 years on anti-nuclear, environmental and indigenous rights, and has been a lecturer with the Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund. Pennie is also a founding member of Idle No More San Francisco Bay, is involved in promoting the Universal Declaration on the Rights of Mother Earth, and founded Gathering Tribes in 1991.

As I write this, I’ve just returned from seeing my niece’s newborn baby girl. As I gazed into her eyes, I said a silent prayer hoping we can find a way to shift the systems of government and business that have allowed the sacred system of life to become so out of balance that everything is now threatened. I also prayed that when she’s an adult that she’d live in a world that’s healthy, sustainable, vibrantly beautiful…and in balance.

“We are all related.” No doubt you’ve heard this phrase before, especially if you have friends who are Indigenous to North America. It has many meanings to many people, but ultimately it means that all of life on Mother Earth’s belly is related or connected. After more than 500 years of Indigenous People of the Americas sharing this information, it’s finally been proven. It’s past time for the western world to listen to the Indigenous People who are traditional and doing their best to live within the Original Instructions, guidelines given to people at the beginning of time, which dictate how to live in balance with our relations and the intelligent forces of nature. It would be a shame for humans to continue to violate these instructions to such an extent that life, as we know it can no longer be supported.

For the complete article visit: WE ARE ALL RELATED: Working together to fight fossil fuels at LUSH Blog.

Pennie is also co-founder of Movement Rights:
Shifting culture and law to truly protect people is the civil rights struggle of our time and its already happening in communities across the nation. Changing the rules will require more than tinkering at the margins of the current legal, political and corporate-led economic system; it will require a system change from the grassroots. It all begins with neighbors coming together to change their community. Movement Rights provides organizing and legal support for communities to assert their right to local self governance with our partners; leadership and international movement building for the rights of nature; and connects Indigenous leadership, wisdom and analysis toward living in balance with natural systems.  

The Paris COP21 failure demonstrates climate justice lies beyond the “Red Line”

Movement Rights Blog, By Shannon Biggs and Pennie Opal Plant, December 21, 2015

If you’ve been confused by the conflicting reports of the success COP 21 negotiations, you’re not alone. On the final day of the UN climate talks, President Obama issued a statement boasting words the nation, the ministers from 196 negotiating countries and the world wanted to hear: “We met the moment.  We came together around a strong agreement the world needed.” The mainstream media quickly heralded the final agreement as The world’s Greatest Diplomatic Success”   and “Big Green” environmental groups like the Sierra Club   and Avaaz blogged that while it may not be the war, as far as the battle goes, “WE WON.”

The Paris COP21 failure demonstrates climate justice lies beyond the “Red Line”

photo links to Movement Rights Blog

Reports of victory (or the whiff of a qualified victory) quickly flooded the internet. Yet standing on the streets of Paris on December 12—lined with over 10,000 people carrying red tulips and unfurling giant red ribbons defying the ban on demonstrations and condemning world leaders failure to put forward a meaningful, binding agreement—we puzzled, and wondered if we were at the same summit. From the red line action on the outside, many justice activists, economists, experts, NGO participants and Indigenous leaders had a very different take on the outcome. Former Bolivian climate negotiator, Pablo Solon told Democracy Now! “The Paris Agreement Will See the Planet Burn.”

So what does the Paris Agreement say that is creating the division of opinions? 

Read the authors’ outline of what IS and what IS NOT in the Paris UNFCCC agreement at A Quick Guide to the Paris Agreement 
as well as an assessment of who is celebrating and why.

About the authors:

Shannon Biggs, Casey Camp Horinek, and Pennie Opal Plant Movement Rights co-founders Shannon Biggs and Pennie  Opal Plant were in Paris for the COP 21 climate events, and to promote grassroots alternatives to the current UN process including co-producing a report on Rights of Nature, co- hosting a beyond-capacity Rights of Nature tribunal that turned away over 1,000 people, co-leading a ceremony for the signing of an international Indigenous Women’s Treaty for Mother Earth, among many other actions, interventions and activities, very often led by our board member, Indigenous leader and Ponca elder, Casey Camp Horinek (pictured). 

WOMEN ON THE RISE – Connecting Stories From The Frontlines

Trailer | WOMEN ON THE RISE – Connecting Stories From The Frontlines from Indigenous Environmental Network on Vimeo.

Trailer for a short film chronicling & connecting the stories of Indigenous Women worldwide leading the charge to protect the rights of Mother Earth and the generations to come; representing frontline communities most impacted by extractive industries.

Stories shared from:
Kandi Mossett (Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara), Native Energy & Climate Campaign Organizer for the Indigenous Environmental Network; Melina Laboucan-Massimo, (Lubicon Cree First Nation ) Climate and Energy Campaigner for Greenpeace Canada; Crystal Lameman (Beaver Lake Cree Nation) Climate and Energy Campaigner for The Sierra Club; Eriel Tchekwie Deranger, communications manager of the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation; Patricia Gualinga Montalvo, Kichwa Leader from the Ecuadorian Amazon | Amazon Watch; Pennie Opal Plant of Idle No More Bay Area California, and more to come.

Nature Puts Chevron Refinery and Legal System on “Trial”

Bay Area Rights of Nature People's Tribunal


“People’s Tribunal” in Oakland Seeks to Give Nature a Voice in Law

 
Oakland, CA — On Sunday October 5, human, indigenous and nature’s rights groups will hold a “Bay Area Rights of Nature Alliance Ethics Tribunal,” examining the violations of community and nature’s rights caused by the fossil fuel industry, and using Chevron’s refinery in Richmond, California as a case study.  Recognizing ecosystem rights in law is a concept that has been gaining strength over the past decade, including in numerous US communities and the constitution of Ecuador.

Two years after the refinery explosion that rocked the Richmond community, residents still live with the threat and reality of further harm, while local air, water and land remain at risk. Moreover, despite having been found guilty of dozens of violations of the law in 2012, Chevron Corp. will be expanding operations at the refinery.

Richmond Chevron Fire 08-06-2012 - 5

Chevron has been destroying nature and poisoning people for over 100 years. Humanity is part of the web of life known as Nature. If Nature doesn’t have rights, then a viable future for the next seven generations is doubtful,says Richmond resident and Native American activist Pennie Opal Plant, who will speak at the Tribunal.

The free Tribunal will take place on Sunday, Oct. 5th from 10 am – 2 pm at The Forum, Laney College. It will highlight the impacts on people and nature from the Chevron refinery, and hear witness testimony regarding current legal and economic systems that advance violations of human and nature’s rights by the fossil fuel industry and others. Tribunal judges include:

  • Carl Anthony (Breakthrough Communities; Urban Habitat)
  • Brian Swimme (California Institute of Integral Studies; Journey of the Universe)
  • Anuradha Mittal (Oakland Institute)
  • Courtney Cummings (Arikara and Cheyenne; Native Wellness Center, Richmond)
  • Bill Twist (Pachamama Alliance)

The day will also include a “Web of Life Labyrinth” by local artists (opening at 9:30 am), local music, and food for purchase. The Bay Area Rights of Nature Alliance is a network of leading San Francisco Bay Area nature’s rights, ecological justice, human rights, local economy, Indigenous, women’s, and other groups, who will be on hand to answer questions. The event is part of the global “Earth Rights Days of Action” sponsored by the Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature and is linked to the International Rights of Nature Tribunals in Quito, Ecuador (Jan. 2014) and Lima, Peru (Dec. 2014).

Save your space for this important event; register now at: http://therightsofnature.org/events/bayareatribunal.

Media Contact:
Linda Sheehan, Earth Law Center
lsheehan@earthlaw.org 510-219-7730
Shannon Biggs, Global Exchange
shannon@globalexchange.org 415.298.9419
Pennie Opal Plant, Gathering Tribes
pennie@gatheringtribes.com 510.390.0386

For a printable copy of this press release:  BARONA Tribunal Media Release 10-2-14

Bioneers: People’s Earth Tribunals

People’s Earth Tribunals and Community Bills of Rights:
Mobilizing for Community and to Enshrine Nature’s Rights

National Bioneers Conference

October 19, 2014 – 4:30pm
San Rafael, CA USA

Growing the Movement - The World We Want & How to Get There

What if ecosystems could sue for violating the rights of nature in places like Alberta’s tar sands or Fukushima? What if communities could write new laws that place their rights and local ecosystems above corporate interests? Come find out about the first international Rights of Nature Tribunal and local California Community Bills of Rights, and how you can participate.

Hosted by Shannon Biggs, Community Rights director, Global Exchange. With: Vandana Shiva, founder/Director, Navdanya; Pennie Opal Plant, Idle No More/Gathering Tribes; Robin Milam, Administrative Director, Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature; Osprey Orielle Lake, founder/Executive Director, Women’s Earth and Climate Caucus; Prajna Marcus, Bay Area Rights of Nature; Linda Sheehan, Executive Director, Earth Law Center.

Part of Earth Rights Days of Action! 

Click for list of events!Earth RIghts Days of Action Events

Register Today!