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Archive for Europe

Alberto Acosta honored with Hans Carl von Carlowitz Award

El Comercio newspaper, Quito
November 23, 2017

Read original El Comercio article in Spanish:
http://www.elcomercio.com/-premio-albertoacosta-opinion

Alberto Acosta honored with Hans Carl von Carlowitz award

NOTE: The Prize was also received by one of the greatest climate change experts, Professor Joachim Schllenhuber, director of the Climate Research Institute in Potsdam

Alberto Acosta, former Minister, President of the Constituent Assembly and outstanding social and political theorist, received the Hans Carl von Carlowitz International Prize in Germany, in recognition of his intellectual merits and his position in favor of the rights of nature, disadvantaged social classes and indigenous peoples.

In the 1980s after finishing the University of Colon, Alberto Acosta made vast tours of our country [Germany], visiting academic centers, labor centers, municipalities, where he discussed important aspects of reality. Sometimes before shrunken audiences, others with a large audience, he explained about the urgency of turning the social, economic and political situation of Ecuador, the historical injustice of the external debt and its claim for the low participation of the people in the decisions of the State.

Shortly after,  through publications and meetings, the ILDIS (Latin American Institute of Social Research) proposed to support the social groups most affected by capital, to defend the claims of the indigenous and afro-descendant communities, affected by the policies of the governments shift. Another of its themes, crucial and constant, refers to the accelerated destruction of nature.

His experience, accumulated through years dedicated to study, research and social battles, inspired important changes and innovations in the 2008 Constitution of Ecuador, aimed at transforming the character of the State, to democratize institutions and laws to make them more flexible and close to the real world. The norms and regulations should embody the desires and popular needs, the true validity of both human rights and those of the environment.

It is undeniable that there is an ideological advance in the political theory of Ecuador. Recognizing it is not only due to outside influences, but to two Quechua-Aymara concepts that have been increasing their meaning. Now, in the political debate, Pacha Mama (Mother Nature) and Suma Kausay (Living Well) are competent. These notions, rescued from an ancestral wisdom ignored for centuries, return to offer “broad ideas that include the relationship with others and with the land and democratic decision-making and community reciprocity,” as Simon Ayampara, leader Aymara.

Acosta has discovered something that remained hidden and that hoped to be understood and projected. Now he travels across Europe, and speaking on issues such as sustainability, extractivism, plurinationality, the capitalist labyrinth, post-capitalism, decolonization, invokes indigenous concepts to accentuate his own vision. The prize that is going to be delivered is very different from the “honoris causa” that is achieved through diplomatic efforts.

International Rights of Nature Tribunal in Bonn Findings

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE : 10 November 2017
Media Contact:
Robert Wager (media contact) robert@endecocide.eu + 49 160 8104348
Cabot Davis (general inquiries) cabot@movementrights.org + 1 (831) 854-7634
Natalia Greene (Tribunal’s Secretariat) nati.greene@gmail.com + 593 9944-3724

Press release Bonn Tribunal (final)-ES (Print Spanish)

Press release Bonn Tribunal (final) (Print English)

BONN, Germany – The 4th session of the International Rights of Nature Tribunal, held concurrently with the 23rd United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Conference of Parties (COP23), exposed the significant role which legal systems play in enabling climate change and global environmental degradation. The Tribunal heard seven cases from around the world which collectively demonstrated that global and national climate change commitments cannot be met without fundamental changes to the legal systems which legalise the activities that cause climate change and the destruction of the ecological systems on which life depends. This is a global problem – one of the cases concerned a massive lignite mine approximately 50 kms from the COP 23 negotiations.

The Bonn Tribunal consisted of 9 judges from 7 countries, and was presided over by the prominent indigenous climate and environmental justice leader, Tom Mato Awanyankapi Goldtooth. Over the course of two days, 53 people from 19 countries speaking over 7 languages presented cases regarding violations of the rights of Nature. A range of experts who testified before the Tribunal explained that whatever is agreed at the COP 23 and subsequent meetings, action to combat climate change will be ineffective while governments continue to authorise coal mines, oil wells and hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”), and the mining of groundwater, and allow corporations to use investor state dispute settlement mechanisms in trade agreements to prevent the taking of effective measures to protect life.

Witnesses gave first-hand accounts of what it is like to live near fracking operations, oil wells and refineries, and coal mines, about how those who defend Mother Earth are persecuted, attacked, criminalised and have their homes burnt. It heard of the anguish of indigenous and other peoples from local communities who live in intimacy with Nature as it is destroyed by roads, mines or industrial agriculture in order to benefit a small elite.

Indigenous peoples from around the world played a prominent role throughout the Tribunal as experts and witnesses. The Tribunal opened with deeply moving ceremonies and evocations of Mother Earth by representatives of the Sámi people of Europe, the Sarayaku community in the Ecuadorian Amazon, and the indigenous peoples of North America. Indigenous peoples from Africa, Russia, Bolivia, Ecuador, French Guyana, and the USA/Turtle Island presented testimonies that drew the Tribunal’s attention to the sacredness of Earth – a dimensions ignored in the COP 23 negotiations.

The Tribunal found that in each of the seven cases, serious and systematic violations of the Universal Declaration of the Rights of Mother Earth (UDRME) had occurred, often accompanied by human rights violations, and in several cases the harm was so severe as to constitute ecocide. In each case the legal system did not provide adequate remedies to prevent on-going harm. In most cases the harm was caused by activities such as deforestation and mining which could only take place because they had been authorised by law. It was abundantly clear those legal systems that elevate property rights and the rights of corporation above the rights of water, air and ecosystems to exist and contribute to the ecological health of the planet, are exacerbating climate change by clothing destructive activities in a cloak of legal legitimacy. The Tribunal noted that carbon, biological and conservation offsets and ecosystem services are financialisation processes that enable Nature to be privatised, commodified and traded in financial market systems. Carbon market are false solutions that do not cut emissions at source.

The Tribunal and panel of Judges

The Tribunal considers cases from the perspective of what is in the best interests of the Earth community as a whole, and hears cases involving alleged violations of the UDRME and international human rights law. The Tribunal was established in 2014 by the members of the Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature and was formally constituted in 2015 in Paris when a wide range of civil society organizations and indigenous communities signed a Peoples’ Convention to establish the Tribunal. Cases are heard by a panel of eminent legal and environmental experts from around the world. The Bonn panel consisted of 9 distinguished judges from 7 countries: President – Tom Goldtooth (Indigenous Environmental Network, Turtle Island – USA); Osprey Orielle Lake (Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network – USA); Alberto Acosta (former president of the Constitutional Assembly – Ecuador); Fernando “Pino” Solanas (senator, Argentina), Ute Koczy (Urgewald E.V., former Parliamentarian, Germany); Cormac Cullinan (Wild Institute Law- South Africa); Simona Fraudatorio (Permanent People’s Tribunal, Italy); Shannon Biggs (Movement Rights, USA), Ruth Nyambura (African Biodiversity Network – Kenya).

Cases heard by the Tribunal in Bonn

Climate Change and False Energy Solutions.

Expert witnesses testified about how corporations such as Exxon not only profit from activities which they know cause dangerous climate change, they have also deliberately promoted false solutions to climate change (e.g. nuclear energy and gas from fracking operations) and are impeded the introduction of renewable energy and other climate change mitigation measures. In some cases corporations have spread false propaganda about indigenous peoples and others opposing the fossil fuel industry.

The Tribunal heard disturbing evidence from witnesses about the severe health impacts of living in places polluted by the coal, oil and gas industries. Evidence was presented about how energy industry operations had contaminated water, air and ground in many parts of the world in violation of the rights of Mother Earth and of human rights. Witnesses from Mauritius and Texas gave evidence of the impacts of severe hurricanes and cyclones caused or exacerbated by climate change. For example, in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, homes were damaged, environmental restrictions were suspended and people had to breathe toxic fumes.

The Tribunal found that gas extraction by means of hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”), nuclear energy and carbon markets are all false solutions used to delay the transition to low-carbon societies. For example, fracking “breaks the bones of the Earth” and only perpetuates the destructive dependence upon oil, and gas. Carbon trading commodifies nature and allows the wealthy to buy the right to exceed national emission limits. The Tribunal decided that promoting and undertaking these activities violates the rights of Nature, including the right to integral health.

Financialization of Nature and the REDD+

Evidence was presented that REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation) framework and other carbon market frameworks and payment for ecological services have resulted in more ecological destruction and pollution and facilitated the establishment and continuation of destructive industries. Witnesses explained how systematic mechanisms, such as REDD+ were resulting in indigenous and local peoples who had not degraded their lands being disposed and losing their rights in order to enable a polluting company elsewhere in the world to continue exceeding air emission limits.

The Tribunal found that that systems such as REDD+ that commodified Nature failed to recognise the reality that human beings are an integral and inseparable part of a living Earth community and that the exploitation, commodification and financialization of Nature is detrimental to all. Those who established these systems or who traded in carbon or biodiversity “credits”, were violating the rights of Nature and failing in their duty to ensure that the pursuit of human wellbeing contributes to the wellbeing of Mother Earth.

Lignite mining in the Hambach Forest

Witnesses gave evidence of how a massive lignite mine near Bonn has created the largest hole in Europe, and as it expands is destroying whole villages and the ancient Hambach forest. The forest has existed for 12,000 years, contains 800 year old trees and is home to 142 protected species. Only about 7 square kilometres of the original 60 square kilometres are left. The Tribunal heard evidence about how burning the lignite from the mine will exacerbate

global warming and cause severe pollution and health risks as well as diminish and pollute the groundwater which sustains the forest and other ecosystems. It also heard evidence from young people who are living high up in the trees in an attempt to protect them from destruction, and of how they now have an intimate relationship with the trees and the forest.

The Tribunal found that further expansion of the mine must be stopped immediately, that the site should be rehabilitated as far as possible and that Germany should recognise the rights of Nature in law in order to prevent such projects in the future. The Tribunal also drew attention to the fact that it is necessary to cease all coal mining as soon as possible in order to mitigate climate change, and particularly its effects on future generations.

Defenders of Mother Earth

The UDRME requires all human beings and institutions to defend the rights of Mother Earth and of all beings. Evidence from around the world exposed the wide-spread disregard for this duty and how people, particularly indigenous peoples, in the United States of America, Russia, Latin America and Africa are being persecuted for defending Nature from harm. In many cases the persecutions of indigenous peoples such as the Sámi peoples over long periods of time were clearly designed to destroy cultural understandings and practices that respect and protect the rights of Mother Earth and other beings.

Witnesses who testified included water protectors from Standing Rock in the United States, and representatives of indigenous peoples from Sweden (Sámi), and Russia (Shor). The Tribunal heard how indigenous people using peaceful means to defend water and Mother Earth are met with violence as governments protect corporate interests as occurred at Standing Rock. The Lakota Sioux tribe was never adequately consulted about the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline across their land. The evidence showed that the pipeline would diminish the quality of life of indigenous peoples minorities, specifically in relationship to the sacredness of water and sacred and cultural significant areas.

The Tribunal noted the ongoing history of systemic violations of the rights of the indigenous peoples. And reiterated that everyone has the duty to defend those who protect the rights of Mother Earth and to break the pattern of violation and abuse of indigenous peoples.

Almeria –deprivation of water

In the Almeria waters case the Tribunal found that the abstractions of huge quantities of water from aquifers in the Almeria region of Spain, primarily to irrigate large-scale intensive olive plantations is a violation of the rights of the rivers and ecological systems of Almeria, and a violation of the human rights of local peoples. The Spanish State and the government of Almeria must act immediately to stop the abstraction of groundwater to enable the ecosystems to recover, and the intensive cultivation of olives in Almeria must cease.

This case illustrates the consequences of treating water as a commodity that can be monopolised by the wealthy instead of recognising water as a vital source of life, which must be respected and afforded the highest level of protection. Although this case focused on a specific area, it is an example of what is happening in many areas of the world, and the principles are universal. Those human societies that do not respect water as life and which fail to take whatever measures are necessary to protect the ecological systems and cycles that generate water, destroy life and ultimately destroy themselves. Water is priceless – societies that sacrifice water sources for money, will pay a terrible price.

Threats to the Amazon

The Tribunal decided to hear a number of cases from different parts of the Amazon simultaneously in order to consider threats to the Amazon ecosystem in a holistic way. It heard evidence of widespread violations of indigenous rights and the rights of Mother Earth throughout the greater Amazon region. This included testimony about the huge mine proposed in French Guyana, and from communities in Brazil, Bolivia and Ecuador. It is clear that this vital ecosystem that is a reservoir of life, home to many peoples and an essential part of maintaining global climatic stability, is being subjected to many attacks which violate its right to exist and maintain its vital cycles. The extractivist global model inevitably results in violations of the rights of the Amazon as a whole and diminishes the quality of life of all organisms in the region.
The Tribunal heard allegations of violations of the rights of Mother Earth arising from the proposed construction of a major road through the TIPNIS protected area in Bolivia and from oil exploitation in the area. Evidence about the victimization and intimidation of those opposing the construction of the road was also placed before the Tribunal. The Tribunal noted this evidence with great concern, particularly because the Universal Declaration of the Rights of Mother Earth was proclaimed in Bolivia in 2010 and Bolivia has championed rights of Nature internationally.

The Tribunal decided that it wished to gather more evidence from all concerned, including the State of Bolivia, and if possible to send a delegation on a fact-finding mission to Bolivia. It also decided to request the Bolivian government to impose a moratorium on construction of the proposed road and bridges through TIPNIS and on further oil exploration in or near TIPNIS, until the Tribunal has completed its work. The Tribunal was of the view that the imposition of such a moratorium would be an appropriate precautionary measure to avoid possible violations of rights of Mother Earth while a resolution to this dispute is being sought.

Trade Agreements and their Implications on Nature

Expert witnesses from Canada, Germany, South Africa and Puerto Rico testified that Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) are the drivers of an unsustainable economy based on fossil fuels, privatization, commodification and legalized enslavement of all life on Earth. FTAs are legally binding and take precedence over non-binding commitments made under the Paris Agreement. States can even be prevented from passing new laws to protect ecosystems if the tribunals established under Investor State Dispute Settlement Mechanisms (ISDSMs) in FTAs decide that they are “barriers to trade”. Indigenous peoples pay the highest price under schemes like NAFTA. Because they have protected and live close to the land, they are targets for displacement in the quest for pristine untapped “resources” for drilling, clear-cutting water mining, etc. For example, 50% of the groundwater has already been depleted in NAFTA affected areas in Mexico.

The Tribunal found that Free Trade Agreements result in systemic violations of the Rights of Nature and are based on the delusion that trade is more important than life. The provisions of these agreements must be regarded as null and void to the extent that they conflict with the rights and duties in the UDRME.

Notes

The Global Alliance for Rights of Nature (GARN) is a network of organizations and individuals committed to the universal adoption and implementation of legal systems that recognize, respect and enforce “Rights of Nature – see https://therightsofnature.org/ The Universal Declaration of the Rights of Nature is available at http://therightsofnature.org/universal-declaration

Bonn Tribunal Program and Brochures

The Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature (GARN) will hold the International Rights of Nature Tribunal in Bonn, at the LVR Landesmuseum on the 7th and 8th of November 2017.

To learn more about the Bonn Tribunal, click the title of a document to download the selected PDF document.  Note: Documents are prepared in ISO A4 format.  Please scale to 90% for US letter format.

Press Release: Cases at the International Rights of Nature Tribunal in Bonn

Bonn Tribunal

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  3 November 2017

Media Contact:
Robert Wager (media contact) robert@endecocide.eu + 49 160 8104348
Cabot Davis (general inquiries) cabot@movementrights.org + 1 (831) 854-7634
Natalia Greene (Tribunal’s Secretariat) nati.greene@gmail.com + 593 9944-3724

PRESS RELEASE                                                                                                            

Bonn RoN Press Release – One Week Away-Nov3
Presseerklärung – Internationale Tribunal für die Rechte der Natur in Bonn, Deutschland

CASES AT THE INTERNATIONAL RIGHTS OF NATURE TRIBUNAL in BONN, GERMANY

BONN, Germany – From November 6th until the 17th, during the 23rd United Nations Convention on Climate Change Conference of Parties (COP23) in Bonn, the world’s nations will reach new agreements on climate change.

In four days (November 7th-8th) the 4th International Rights of Nature Tribunal will hear 7 cases from a new socio-economic perspective based on the interdependence between humans and nature. 50 people will be on stage coming from over 19 countries and speaking in over 7 languages. Cases will be presented regarding violations of nature’s rights from all over the world. Presenters include prominent voices from indigenous communities.

Immediately prior to the opening ceremony, there will be a welcoming from the Deputy Mayor of the city of Bonn, Reinhard Limbach.

The Tribunal will begin with an opening indigenous ceremony.  The ceremony will be performed by Åsa Simma of the Sámi People, Tom Goldtooth of the Dine’ Dakota, Mirian Cisneros and Yaku Viteri of the Sarayaku people.

The Tribunal will then consider seven cases over the next two days. The cases are as follows:

  1. A case on Climate Change focusing on False Energy Solutions. This case will concern violations of  the rights of nature caused by fracking, nuclear energy and the consolidation of fossil fuels in North America. The judge will be Osprey Orielle Lake and the prosecutor will be Ramiro Ávila. The case will be presented by Tadzio Mueller. Experts providing testimony will be Enrique Viale, Rheinhard Uhrig and Ben Beachy. The Tribunal will also hear from affected persons Kashmira Banee and Bryan Parras.
  2. The tribunal will then consider violations of the rights of nature caused by the Financialization of Nature and the REDD+ framework. The judge for this case will be Ruth Nyambura, while the prosecutor will be Linda Sheehan. The case will be presented by Jutta Kill, the expert is Melissa Moreano with the affected person being Ken Henshaw.
  3. The third case will concern Lignite Mining and the Hambach Forest in Germany. Ute Koczy will be the judge and the case will be prosecuted by Ramiro Ávila. The presenter is Emilio Alfred Weinberg. The experts in this case will be Eva Töller and Alberto Saldamando.
  4. A case will be presented concerning violations of the rights of nature concerning Defenders of Mother Earth. The judge for this case is Simona Fraudatario and the prosecutor is Linda Sheehan. Specifically, the case will concern violations of the rights of the indigenous peoples in the following areas:

Standing Rock, USA. Presented by Dallas Goldtooth. The expert and impacted person is Kandi Mossett.

The Shor People, Russia. Presented by Vladislav Tannagashev. The expert and impacted person is Yana Tannagasheva.

The Sàmi People, Scandinavia. Presented by Stefan Mikaelsson. The expert and impacted person will be Åsa Simma.

  1. The fifth case will concern water deprivation in Almería, Spain. The judge for this case will be Cormac Cullinan, while the prosecutor will be Ramiro Ávila. The presenter for this case will be David Dene. The expert in this case will be Ion Holban and the affected person in this case will be Sheila Andion García.
  2. The Tribunal will consider a case concerning various threats to the rights of nature in the Amazon. The judges will be Alberto Acosta and Fernando “Pino” Solano and the prosecutor will be Ramiro Ávila. The case will concern the following areas:

Ecuador’s Amazon and Sarayaku. This aspect of the case will be presented by Esperanza Martinez. The expert is Mirian Cisneros, while the impacted person will be Yaku Viteri.

Brazil’s Amazon. This part of the case will be presented by Sônia Guajajara. The expert will be Ninawa Yawanawa.

Tipnis in Bolivia. The presenter will be Martin Viela. The expert will be Fabian Gil Rocha and the impacted person is Marqueza Teco Moyoviri de Maleca.

Montagne d’Or in French Guyana. Presented by Marine Calmet, the expert is Patrick Monnier and the impacted person is Christophe Pierre.

  1. The final case concerns Trade Agreements and their Implications on Nature. The judge for this case will be Shannon Biggs and the prosecutor will be Linda Sheehan. This case will be presented by Maude Barlow.  The expert will be Jörg Haas and the affected people will be Ndivile Mokoena, Makoma Lekalakala and Alberto Saldamando.

The cases will be presented in multiple languages, including German, English, French, Spanish, Portuguese (with simultaneous translation)and the indigenous languages of the affected persons.

On November 7th and 8th, the Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature (GARN) will hold the International Rights of Nature Tribunal in Bonn, at the LVR-Landesmuseum with an informative teach-in event to follow. This approach is based on the Universal Declaration of the Rights of Nature, which recognizes the rights of ecosystems to exist and thrive and the duty of humanity to respect the integrity of their life cycles.

For more information, please visit https://therightsofnature.org/ron-tribunal-bonn/  #RONTribunalBonn

# # #

The International Rights of Nature Tribunal will be held at LVR-LandesMuseum Bonn, Colmantstr. 14-16, 53115 Bonn, 8:00 am to 7:00 pm (0800 to 1900).

About the Global Alliance for Rights of Nature (GARN) https://therightsofnature.org/

GARN is a network of organizations and individuals committed to the universal adoption and implementation of legal systems that recognize, respect and enforce “Rights of Nature” and to making the idea of Rights of Nature an idea whose time has come.

 

Cuarto Tribunal Internacional de Derechos de la Naturaleza, Bonn, Alemania

Bonn Tribunal
LANZAMIENTO INMEDIATO
2 de noviembre 2017

Contacto de prensa:
Robert Wager (contacto de prensa) robert@endecocide.eu + 49 160 810 4348
Natalia Greene (Secretaría del Tribunal) nati.greene@gmail.com + 593 9944-3724

BOLETÍN DE PRENSA

CUARTO TRIBUNAL INTERNACIONAL DE DERECHOS DE LA NATURALEZA, BONN – ALEMANIA

 Boletin de Prensa- Tribunal Español

BONN, Alemania – Del 6 al 17 al 17 de noviembre se llevará a cabo la Cumbre de las Partes Naciones Unidas por el Cambio Climático (COP23) en Bonn, donde los gobiernos buscan consolidar acuerdos en torno al tema. Sin embargo, la sociedad civil tiene poca fe en sus resultados debido a lo poco que se ha alcanzado ya en 22 Cumbres.

En 4 días se reúne el 4to Tribunal Internacional de Derechos de la Naturaleza que escuchará a casos desde una nueva perspectiva socio económica y ecológica sobre la interdependencia de los seres humanos con la naturaleza. Estos casos presentarán violaciones de derechos de la naturaleza en todo el mundo, visibilizando voces indígenas y afectadas de todo el planeta.

Abrirá el evento el Concejal de Bonn Reinhard Limbach, seguido por una ceremonia indígena liderada por Åsa Simma del pueblo europeo Sámi (último pueblo indígena), Tom Goldtooth de los Dine’ Dakota, Mirian Cisneros y Yaku Viteri de Sarayaku Ecuador.

Este Tribunal contará con 7 jueces de alta calidad moral y ética para escuchar los casos:

Tom BK Goldtooth, Presidente del Tribunal, de la Indigenous Environmental Network, Nación Dine’/Dakota
Cormac Cullinan Director  del Instituto Wild Law Institute, Sudáfrica
Osprey Orielle Lake de Women’s Earth & Climate Action Network, International (WECAN), Estados Unidos
Alberto Acosta ex Presidente de la Asamblea Nacional Constituyente, Ecuador
Shannon Biggs de Movement Rights, Estados Unidos
Simona Fraudatario Tribunal Permanente de los Pueblos, Italia
Fernando “Pino” Solanas Senador pro Buenos Aires, Argentina

Los fiscales para el Tribunal serán: Ramiro Ávila (Universidad Andina Simón Bolívar, Ecuador), Linda Sheehan (Planet Pledge, EUA). La Secretaría estará a cargo de Natalia Greene (Alianza Global por los Derechos de la Naturaleza, Ecuador)

El Tribunal considerará los siguientes 7 casos durante los próximo 2 días.

  1. Cambio Climático y las falsas soluciones energéticas. Este caso revisa como la fractura hidráulica, la energía nuclear y la consolidación de la industria de los combustibles fósiles en Estados Unidos no resuelven sino agravan el problema mundial.
  2. Financialización de la Naturaleza y REDD+ Este caso revisa como el tratamiento de mercado de bosques y biodiversidad no es una solución, afecta a poblaciones locales y vulnera a la naturaleza.
  3. Minería de Lignito – Bosque Hambach en Alemania. Activistas de Ende Galende presentan la afectación de las minas de lignito y como resisten que se acabe con el bosque Hambach, muy cerca de Bonn.
  4. Defensores de la Madre Tierra. Este caso escuchará a afectados del oleoducto trans-americano y Standing Rock (EUA), nativos de Rusia por el carbón y la persecución al pueblo Sámi en Europa.
  5. Escasez de Agua en Almería, España a causa de la producción industrial de aceitunas.
  6. Amenazas a la Amazonía. Este caso escuchará como se afecta la Amazonía ecuatoriana y el caso Sarayaku; la Amazonía brasilera, el grave problema de Tipnis en Bolivia y el problema en Montaña de Oro, Guyana Francesa.
  7. Implicaciones de los Acuerdos de Libre Comercio en la Naturaleza, demostrará lo que han causado estos acuerdos a la tierra y a la gente directamente afectada.

El Tribunal escuchará a 50 personas provenientes de 19 nacionalidades en 7 idiomas diferentes durante un día y medio, el 7 y 8 de noviembre en el LVR-LandesMuseum en Bonn, seguido de una sesión de talleres de soluciones (8 por la tarde).

Para más información, visitar: https://therightsofnature.org/ron-tribunal-bonn/  #RONTribunalBonn

# # #

Tribunal Internacional de Derechos de la Naturaleza se desarrollará en el LVR-LandesMuseum Bonn, Colmantstr. 14-16, 53115 Bonn, de 8:00 am a 7:00 pm.

Organiza, la Alianza Global por los Derechos de la Naturaleza, una red de organizaciones e individuos comprometidos con la adopción e implementación de sistemas legales que reconozcan y respeten a la Naturaleza como Sujeto de Derechos. https://therightsofnature.org/

Press Release: International Rights of Nature Tribunal Bonn, Germany

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 28th 2017

Media Contact:
Robert Wager (media contact) robert@endecocide.eu + 49 151 1547-2813
Cabot Davis (general inquiries) cabot@movementrights.org + 1 (831) 854-7634
Natalia Greene (Tribunal’s Secretariat) nati.greene@gmail.com + 593 9944-3724

PRESS RELEASE                          Print: International Rights of Nature Press Release Oct 28 2017

INTERNATIONAL RIGHTS OF NATURE TRIBUNAL in BONN, GERMANY

BONN, Germany – From November 6th until the 17th, during the 23rd United Nations Convention on Climate Change Conference of Parties (COP23) in Bonn, the world’s nations will reach new agreements on climate change.

On November 7th and 8th, the Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature (GARN) will hold the International Rights of Nature Tribunal in Bonn, at the LVR-Landesmuseum with an informative teach-in event to follow. This approach is based on the Universal Declaration of the Rights of Nature, which recognizes the rights of ecosystems to exist and thrive and the duty of humanity to respect the integrity of their life cycles.

We are pleased to announce that the judges of the International Rights of Nature Tribunal will include:

Tom BK Goldtooth, President of the Tribunal, from the Indigenous Environmental Network,
Dine’/Dakota, Turtle Island, United States

Osprey Orielle Lake of Women’s Earth & Climate Action Network, International (WECAN), United States

Shannon Biggs of Movement Rights, United States

Cormac Cullinan Wild Law Institute and author of Wild Law: A Manifesto for Earth Justice, South Africa

Alberto Acosta former President of the National Constitutional Assembly of Ecuador, Ecuador

Simona Fraudatario of the People’s Permanent Tribunal, Italy

Fernando “Pino” Solanas  Senator from Buenos Aires, Argentina

Ute Koczy (Urgewald E.V., former German Parlamentarian, Germany)

Ruth Nyambura (African Ecofeminists Collective, Kenya)


The International Rights of Nature Tribunal
is a unique, citizen-created initiative to testify publicly about the destruction of the Earth and propose a systemic alternative to environmental protection and current environmental laws. “Recognizing the Earth as a living system of which humans are a part, rather than as human property to be owned and destroyed is a fundamental shift from the way the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) climate process works,” says Tribunal President, Tom BK Goldtooth. “If we are to find a solution to climate change, we must stop treating the Earth as a commodity.”

This two-day event will replicate the judicial process based on the concepts listed above. This esteemed panel will hear cases regarding climate change and false energy solutions, the financialization of nature, lignite mining in Germany, defenders of mother earth (USA-Standing Rock, Russia and the Sámi People),  water deprivation in Almeria-Spain, threats to the Amazon (in Ecuador, Brazil and Tipnis-Bolivia), and the impact of free trade agreements and international trade in nature.

Two countries, dozens of US communities and ecosystems in 4 countries now have recognized rights and legal standing at various levels. The International Rights of Nature Tribunal is part of an effort to promote a change of consciousness and highlight the need to expand the international legal framework, national laws and courts to ensure the safety of the planet by preserving biodiversity and respecting ecosystem dynamics.

For more information, please visit https://therightsofnature.org/rights-of-nature-tribunal/      #RONTribunalBonn

# # #

The International Rights of Nature Tribunal will be held at LVR-LandesMuseum Bonn, Colmantstr. 14-16, 53115 Bonn, 8:00 am to 7:00 pm (0800 to 1900).

About the Global Alliance for Rights of Nature (GARN) https://therightsofnature.org/

GARN is a network of organizations and individuals committed to the universal adoption and implementation of legal systems that recognize, respect and enforce “Rights of Nature” and to making the idea of Rights of Nature an idea whose time has come.

Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature

Earth Rights Conference – Sigtuna, Sweden April 21-22, 2017

What idea is powerful enough to heal the relationship between humans and nature?

This conference will be a space for dialogue and co-creation about the idea that nature, not just humans, have rights. In a time of accelerating socio-ecological challenges, Earth rights is the focus of interest at different scales, from local communities to UN bodies. It is an ancient idea, present in indigenous cultures all around the world. Can Earth rights be the foundation of a new culture of respect and harmony between people and planet?

Earth Rights Conference - Sigtuna, Sweden, 2017Come to Sweden’s oldest town, Sigtuna, in April and investigate. For more details visit:  http://www.earthrightsconference.org/

Sigtunastiftelsen
Manfred Björkquists allé 4
193 31 Sigtuna
Sweden

WORKSHOPS FRIDAY

Advancing the Rights of Nature

This workshop with Mari Margil from Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund (CELDF) will provide a practical examination of the Rights of Nature – what it is; why and how it is advancing around the world; and strategies for advancing it at the local and national level in Sweden and other countries. This will include discussion on how existing environmental laws legalize the use and exploitation of nature, and how these frameworks are unable to protect nature.

Art for the Rights of Nature

To open up for the solidarity with all living beings, we need to open to a sensory, creative exploration of ourselves and the world. A mindful, intuitive workshop, where we explore our inner sense of music and rhythm, and practise interbeing. How can we create sounds, noise and gestures into a co-creative piece? How can we listen to our true selves and to the group at the same time? An adventure beyond words with Peder Karlsson and Annika Lykta.

Ecological Rights and Environmental Justice

Humans, as part of nature, share the rights of nature. We live together in interconnected and interdependent ways. This workshop will reflect on how rights of nature relate to human rights and environmental justice. The demands that human societies place on nature may imply an unequal distribution of rights in some cases. Moreover, rights that are beneficial to certain societies may or may not be beneficial for other societies or lives. By extension, rights for nature must entail different kinds of rights for different communities. How might rights of nature support non-exploitative, mutually nurturing relationships between people? This workshop includes a conversation between Stefania Barca, Martin Hultman, Cormac Cullinan and Marie Persson moderated by Marco Armiero, director of Environmental Humanities Laboratory at KTH.

Law & Ecological Awakening

This workshop explores ecocide law as an expression and agent of ecological awakening. Law influences our values and steers our behaviour; ecocide law will steer our behaviour towards ecological citizenship. Making ecocide an international crime could help humans reconnect to nature by the values they prioritize: people and planet above profit. Lawyer Femke Wijdekop explores connections between the promotion of Ecocide law and alignment of intellect, body and heart to act from a place of connection to Earth. Niklas Högberg, Lodyn, will guide the participants through a process of reconnecting to ourselves, each other and the planet.

WORKSHOPS SATURDAY

The International Tribunal for the Rights of Nature

Cormac Cullinan discusses how the Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature is using the International Tribunal for the Rights of Nature to pioneer and experiment with alternative international and regional governance structures, and to provide a space for sharing experience about the damage done to nature. Next Tribunal is planned in Bonn, november 2017 in adjunction with COP 23.

Co-Creating a New Earth Rights Movement from the Inside Out – A truth and reconciliation process in every heart

To be an earth rights activist means to be a carrier of a new paradigm, a new story in which rights of nature is transformed from one of many ideas into shaping the context for our common future. This is a journey of deep re-learning that requires courage – the courage to face yourself, others, the world and nature in new ways. The courage to be, feel, think and act from the inside out. This journey can be viewed as a truth and reconciliation process in every heart, aimed at restoring balance in all our relationships. We will take part in an extraordinary testimony by the Giron Sámi Teáhter: Their own truth and reconciliation commission based on stories by the Sámi people who seek to recover after ages of colonization and oppression. In the workshop, indigenous rights are interweaved with Earth rights as well as the rights of all people to live in peace and balance with nature. We will explore what it means to empower ourselves and each other in our own healing journeys, as parts of a global eco-social movement connected by a common vision: The ancient and revolutionary idea of Earth rights. A focus of the workshop is the co-creation of a short Earth Rights Declaration by the participants. With Åsa Simma, CEO of Giron Sámi Teáhter, Marie Persson, Sámi activist and Niklas Högberg, Lodyn.

Earth rights and the role of native spiritual traditions

Indigenous and traditional cosmovisions have been a very important inspiration for the Rights of Nature movement from the start. The sacredness and interconnectedness of all life is the foundation whereupon indigenous cultures are built. Dominant paradigms of colonization and modernization through history and in present times have caused transformations and even loss of many spiritual traditions. In this sense decolonization of indigenous knowledge and spirituality become an important challenge. This workshop is a dialogue between Patricia Gualinga from the Sarayaku, an indigenous community in the Ecuadorian Amazon, and Henrik Hallgren, practitioner of Forn Sidr – the Scandinavian heathen tradition. The dialogue is expressed partly as a shared ceremony and partly as a verbal dialogue where all participants will be invited to share reflections.

The Nature of learning – Humanity and the More-than-Human world in Education

How do we embed questions of humanity and nature in our learning? How do we address the overarching crucial concepts and values that shape how we see our roles as humans? In this workshop we will discuss the importance of making questions on the relationship between humanity and nature a priority in education about/for sustainability. Facilitated by Isak Stoddard and Malin Östman, together we will explore possibilities and challenges for educators and students, drawing on experiences and pedagogical practice from the transdisciplinary, collaborative and student-centred courses at the Centre for Environment and Development Studies (CEMUS) at Uppsala University and Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.

European Parliament in Brussels – Envisioning a world that considers nature’s rights

Enhancing the value of nature can play an important role in addressing some of the planet’s most pressing environmental challenges. Acknowledging nature’s rights may be a useful tool to help  leverage nature and aid in reaching Europe’s biodiversity targets. On 29 March 2017, Nature’s Rights – a non-profit organisation seeking to establish legal personality and rights for ecosystems and species – held an event at the European Parliament in Brussels, to launch their initiative in Europe and explore the possibilities granting nature’s rights could bring to the discussion.

Envisioning a world that considers nature’s rights: An introductory discussion in Europe

Co-hosted by MEPs Pavel Poc, Vice-Chair of ENVI Committee; Benedek Jávor, Vice-Chair of ENVI Committee; and Marco Affronte, ENVI Committee Member, the event: “Nature’s Rights Conference : The Missing Piece of the Puzzle” brought together a high-level panel to discuss how granting legal rights to nature might help to create the paradigm shift needed to live more sustainably and harmoniously within our planet’s limits.

Luc Bas, Director, IUCN European Regional Office provided one of the keynote speeches sharing IUCN’s views on rights for nature. IUCN and its Members clearly recognise the importance of nature’s rights as the resolution “Incorporation of the Rights of Nature as the organisational focal point in IUCN decision making”  was adopted at the IUCN World Conservation Congress 2012 in Jeju. The Resolution invites IUCN and its Members to promote the development of a Universal Declaration of the Rights of Nature as a first step towards  reconciliation between human beings and the Earth as the basis of our lives, as well as the foundations of a new civilising pact. Since then, the rights for nature has also been referenced in the IUCN Global Programme 2017-2020, adopted in at the IUCN World Conservation Congress 2016 in Hawaiʽi.

“Being a science-based and evidence-based organisation, IUCN will continue to explore and evaluate the benefits of such an initiative,” said Luc Bas.

IUCN was joined by Hans Bruyninckx, Executive Director, European Environment Agency who talked about the need for systemic solutions to address the challenges of the 21st Century. Panellists included Proffesor Massimiliano Montini, Sienna University and Cambridge University C-EENRG Fellow; MEP Sirpa Pietikäinen (EPP); Jen Morgan, Systems Change Consultant; and Mumta Ito, Lawyer and Founder of Nature’s Rights.

Learn more about Nature’s Rights and their draft directive here.