Image

Author Archive for Global Alliance on behalf of Author listed below

Alberto Acosta honored with Hans Carl von Carlowitz Award

El Comercio newspaper, Quito
November 23, 2017

Read original El Comercio article in Spanish:
http://www.elcomercio.com/-premio-albertoacosta-opinion

Alberto Acosta honored with Hans Carl von Carlowitz award

NOTE: The Prize was also received by one of the greatest climate change experts, Professor Joachim Schllenhuber, director of the Climate Research Institute in Potsdam

Alberto Acosta, former Minister, President of the Constituent Assembly and outstanding social and political theorist, received the Hans Carl von Carlowitz International Prize in Germany, in recognition of his intellectual merits and his position in favor of the rights of nature, disadvantaged social classes and indigenous peoples.

In the 1980s after finishing the University of Colon, Alberto Acosta made vast tours of our country [Germany], visiting academic centers, labor centers, municipalities, where he discussed important aspects of reality. Sometimes before shrunken audiences, others with a large audience, he explained about the urgency of turning the social, economic and political situation of Ecuador, the historical injustice of the external debt and its claim for the low participation of the people in the decisions of the State.

Shortly after,  through publications and meetings, the ILDIS (Latin American Institute of Social Research) proposed to support the social groups most affected by capital, to defend the claims of the indigenous and afro-descendant communities, affected by the policies of the governments shift. Another of its themes, crucial and constant, refers to the accelerated destruction of nature.

His experience, accumulated through years dedicated to study, research and social battles, inspired important changes and innovations in the 2008 Constitution of Ecuador, aimed at transforming the character of the State, to democratize institutions and laws to make them more flexible and close to the real world. The norms and regulations should embody the desires and popular needs, the true validity of both human rights and those of the environment.

It is undeniable that there is an ideological advance in the political theory of Ecuador. Recognizing it is not only due to outside influences, but to two Quechua-Aymara concepts that have been increasing their meaning. Now, in the political debate, Pacha Mama (Mother Nature) and Suma Kausay (Living Well) are competent. These notions, rescued from an ancestral wisdom ignored for centuries, return to offer “broad ideas that include the relationship with others and with the land and democratic decision-making and community reciprocity,” as Simon Ayampara, leader Aymara.

Acosta has discovered something that remained hidden and that hoped to be understood and projected. Now he travels across Europe, and speaking on issues such as sustainability, extractivism, plurinationality, the capitalist labyrinth, post-capitalism, decolonization, invokes indigenous concepts to accentuate his own vision. The prize that is going to be delivered is very different from the “honoris causa” that is achieved through diplomatic efforts.

Movement Rights issues new report for Bonn

Movement Rights in Bonn, Germany
Rights of Nature and Mother Earth Rights Based Law by Movement Rights-WECAN-IEN
Movement Rights is in Bonn Germany with colleagues to present Rights of Nature as an alternative framework for justice and climate rights. Today they are launching their new report for Bonn, Rights of Nature & Mother Earth Rights Based Law, which Movement Rights, co-edited with partners Women’s Earth and Climate Network (WECAN) and the International Environmental Network (IEN).

With contributions from global leaders including Pablo Solon (Bolivia); Cormac Cullinan (South Africa) Maude Barlow (Canada) and many others, this report explores not just the idea of a radical shift toward recognizing rights of ecosystems (and our responsibilities to the Earth) but includes global examples from around the world where these new laws are taking root. They are inviting readers to Please download and share this new report.

Movement Rights, WECAN and IEN are organizing members and active participants in the 4th International Rights of Nature Tribunal hosted by the Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature (GARN) November 7-8 in Bonn, at the LVR-Landesmuseum with an informative teach-in event to follow.

Click to read Movement Rights Announcement newsletter.

First Rights of Nature Symposium: Driving Rights of Nature into Law

Opportunities, Risks, and Obstacles
Friday October 27, 2017

Rights of Nature Symposium: Driving Rights of Nature into Law – Opportunities, Risks, and Obstacles.The Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund (CELDF), with its International Center for the Rights of Nature, is partnering with Tulane Law School to host the Rights of Nature Symposium: Driving Rights of Nature into Law – Opportunities, Risks, and Obstacles.

The Symposium will bring together key leaders in the Rights of Nature movement – from Ecuador, Nepal, the United States, Australia, and other countries, as well as from local communities and tribal nations. Today, communities, people, and even governments are recognizing that there is a need to make a fundamental shift in humankind’s relationship with the natural world by placing the highest protections on nature through the recognition of legal rights.

Jason Flores-WilliamsJason Flores-Williams, who initiated the Colorado River v. State of Colorado lawsuit, is one of our featured speakers. He joins Rights of Nature leaders from Nepal, Australia, Ecuador, and Sweden, and from tribal nations and local communities.  Visit CELDF Rights of Nature Symposium for list of presenters including prominent leading attorneys, community leaders, professors, and Rights of Nature advocates from around the world.

Participate in the Symposium to learn about the Rights of Nature and how you can become involved in this growing movement!

LIVESTREAMING & VIDEOS

The Symposium will be livestreamed on the Tulane Law School YouTube Channel. You do not need to register for livestreaming. Following the conference, videos of panels and speakers will be made available on the Symposium webpage. Even if you are not in New Orleans, join the event via livestreaming (registration is not required for livestreaming), the conference program, and key conference information.

Co-hosted by Tulane University Law School and

CELDF Rights of Nature Symposium

1st Great International Assembly of the Alliance of Mother Nature’s Guardians

Assembly to be held in Brasilia, Brazil ~ October 11-17, 2017

Brasilia - First Great International Assembly of the Alliance of Mother Nature's Guardians

The first Great Assembly of the Alliance of Mother Nature’s Guardians will be held in Brasilia from the 11th to 16th of October 2017.
Nearly 200 indigenous representatives from around the world and personalities committed to environmental preservation wi ll meet for over five days to discuss global issues which impact the future of humanity climate, biodiversity, environment, energy, technology, conflicts, human rights, nature’s rights …

Working from the problems, challenges and solutions found on the traditional territories of indigenous peoples from a ll continents, be trey forests, islands, arctic , deserts, steppes or mountains, together they will build an inspiring strategy to protect the planet, for peace, for future generations.

The tasks of the historic Great Assembly will be divided into three main themes: Mother Nature, Humanity and Development. Proposals and recommendations to States and calls to action to the general public will be formalized, based on the 17 points set out in the Constitution of the Alliance of Mother Nature’s Guardians, drafted during COP21 in Paris in 2015.

The other objective of this Assembly is to strengthen links between participants, to help build permanent bridges between geographically remote peoples in view of future joint actions.

As a result of the Assembly ‘s work, a common document will be drafted and adopted. It will be presented to international bodies and a delegation of indigenous representatives from all continents will then participate in COP23 (Bonn, Germany, Nov 2017) and in 2018, following on from the Great Assembly, will embark on an international tour to present and defend the strategy of the Alliance of Mother Nature’s Guardians, advocating for protection of the planet. The tour will be supported by local artists, organizations and personalities in each capital city visited.

For more information visit Brazil AGMN English presentation (300dpi)

For more on the Alliance visit: Alliance of Mother Nations Guardians  or AGMN Portuguese.

 

 

Tribute to François Houtard

Francois HoutartThe Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature wants to pay tribute to François Houtart (7 March 1925 in Brussels, Belgium – 6 June 2017 in Quito, Ecuador), Belgian marxist sociologist and Catholic priest who advocated for human rights and earth rights. François Houtart served as our honorable judge during the International Rights of Nature Tribunal held in Lima Perú on the 5th and 6th of December 2014.

All the judges of the Rights of Nature Tribunals are chosen due to their high moral and ethical record, representing civil society’s maximum authorities, in order to hear and judge important Rights of Nature violations around the world.

It is with great sympathy that we accompany his loved ones, honor his life and thank him for his amazing contribution, as a writer, as a philosopher, as a theologist and as an activist for peace for among humans as with the Earth.

When Rivers Are Granted Legal Status as Persons

Sierra Club history plays a role in recently revived Rights of Nature movement
SIERRA, The national magazine of the Sierra Club
By Diane Covington-Carter | May 9 2017

In March, the Whanganui River, which winds through the North Island of New Zealand, became the world's first natural resource to be granted

In March, the Whanganui River, which winds through the North Island of New Zealand, became the world’s first natural resource to be granted “legal personhood.” (Photos courtesy of Visit Whanganui.)

Members of New Zealand’s indigenous Maori tribes have always regarded themselves as part of the universe—at one with and equal to the mountains, rivers, and seas. On March 15, 2017, after 140 years of negotiation, they helped a long-revered river, the Whanganui, gain “legal status as a person.” This means that polluting or damaging the river—New Zealand’s third longest—is now legally equivalent to harming a human.

The Whanganui River was the world’s first natural resource granted its own legal identity, with the rights, duties, and liabilities of a legal person. This breakthrough legislation effectively brought the longest-running litigation in New Zealand’s history to an end, prompting the hundreds of Maori who had gathered in the gallery of Parliament to break into a jubilant, 10-minute-long song of celebration.

Read the full article at  When Rivers Are Granted Legal Status as Persons …
Sierra Club history plays a role in recently revived Rights of Nature movement, SIERRA, May 9, 2017

Colombia Constitutional Court Finds Atrato River Possesses Rights

Press Release:  The Court Finds the Atrato Possesses Rights to “Protection, Conservation, Maintenance, and Restoration”

Rights of Nature Movement Gaining Ground as Court Declares Need to Move
Away from Legal Systems in Which Humans are the “Dominator of Nature”

“(I)t is the human populations that are interdependent of the natural world – and not the opposite – and that they must assume the consequences of their actions and omissions with the nature. It is a question of understanding this new sociopolitical reality with the aim of achieving a respectful transformation with the natural world and its environment, as has happened before with civil and political rights…Now is the time to begin taking the first steps to effectively protect the planet and its resources before it is too late…” – Colombia Constitutional Court

Press Statement

Contact:
Mari Margil
mmargil@celdf.org

MERCERSBURG, PA, USA: In November, in an extraordinary decision, Colombia’s Constitutional Court declared that the Atrato River basin possesses rights to “protection, conservation, maintenance, and restoration.”  The decision is only now being made public.

Columbia's Atrato River has rightsThe Court’s ruling comes in a case brought to address the significant degradation of the Atrato River basin from mining, impacting nature and indigenous peoples.

Declaring that the river has rights comes after thousands of years of history in which nature has been treated as “property” or “right-less” under the law.  Much like women, indigenous peoples, and slaves have been treated as property under the law, without legal rights, so today do legal systems treat nature.  Under this system, environmental laws regulate human use of nature, resulting in the decline of species and ecosystems worldwide, and the acceleration of climate change.

Transforming nature to be considered as rights-bearing – and thus in possession of legally enforceable rights – is part of the growing “Rights of Nature” movement.  The Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund (CELDF) has been at the forefront of this movement, partnering with communities and governments in developing the world’s first Rights of Nature laws.

more …

Read full release at CELDF.org Colombia Court finds Atrato Rivers Possesses Rights

When Rivers Hold Legal Rights

See full article in Earth Island Institute
by Shannon Biggs of Movement Rights– April 17, 2017

New Zealand and India recognize personhood for ecosystems

Winding its way through dense forest laced with hidden waterfalls, the Whanganui River is the largest navigable river in Aotearoa, the Māori word for New Zealand. With the passage of the Te Awa Tupua (Whanganui River Claims Settlement) Bill in March, the river became the first water system in the world to be recognized as a rights-bearing entity, holding legal “personhood” status. One implication of the agreement is that the Whanganui River is no longer property of New Zealand’s Crown government — the river now owns itself.

When Rivers Hold Legal Rights, Earth Island Institute Photo by Kathrin & Stefan Marks

In March, the Whanganui River in New Zealand became the first water body in the world to receive legal personhood status. Photo by Kathrin & Stefan Marks

Five days after the Te Awa Tupua Bill, the High Court of Uttarakhand at Naintal, in northern India, issued a ruling declaring that both the Ganga and Yumana rivers are also “legal persons/living persons.” But what does it mean for a river, or an ecosystem to hold rights? The answer may vary from place to place.

Read full article …

 

About the author:

Shannon Biggs
Shannon Biggs is the Executive Director of Movement Rights, advancing rights for Indigenous peoples, communities, and ecosystems. She is also the co-founder of the Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature and the co-editor of the book, The Rights of Nature: The Case for the Universal Declaration on the Rights of Mother Earth.